Yasmeen Abdallah
Yasmeen Abdallah
Hannah Rose Berry
Hannah Rose Berry
Rosa Bozhkov
Rosa Bozhkov
Nell Breyer
Nell Breyer
Andrea Caldarise
Andrea Caldarise
Abby Cochran
Abby Cochran
Haleigh Collins
Haleigh Collins
Kat Deiner
Kat Deiner
Martin Dull
Martin Dull
Alyssa Eble
Alyssa Eble
Eliza Evans
Eliza Evans
Meryl Feigenberg
Meryl Feigenberg
Jacqueline Ferrante
Jacqueline Ferrante
Christina Graham
Christina Graham
Dianne Hebbert
Dianne Hebbert
Annika Klein
Annika Klein
Genevieve Lowe
Genevieve Lowe
Jamie Mirabella
Jamie Mirabella
Kate Muehlemann
Kate Muehlemann
Gal Nissim
Gal Nissim
Justin O'Brien
Justin O'Brien
Aston Philip
Aston Philip
Zoe Schwartz
Zoe Schwartz
Alexandra Seiler
Alexandra Seiler
Ruyin Tsai
Ruyin Tsai
Lesley Wamsley
Lesley Wamsley
Soo Yun
Soo Yun
Yasmeen Abdallah
Yasmeen Abdallahimage: Suspect Device, 2016. 10 in x 8 in. "I approach my art practice as a form of visual anthropology. Contemplating the human condition through biology & evolutionary processes, social constructs, and correlations between intuition & logic, I explore the emotional and intellectual capacities our species is capable of. Heavily process-based and as equally focused on materiality as concept, I create work from discarded one-use objects and transform them into new entities stripped from their intended graveyard destinies. It is as much about their past histories as their potential. These relics are symbolic of the human footprint; from birth, to death, to the hereafter, they rise and fall, and speak on both collective and individual levels. This aesthetic demonstrates traits of the imperfect perfectionist: a fusion of methodical, distinctive choices, married to evidence of the hand in the work. A train of thought is left for the viewer to unravel and unpack. Curiosity leads to questions, and an open dialogue is at the core. It is an archaeology of the present, the excavation of our lives in an age of instantaneous history. Social media keeps us updated by the second, with day-old objects becoming relics of our immediate past. Because of this advanced technology, we have been thrust into new territories of time and space. There is a present consciousness that is political through apolitical modes and gestures. Expressions of incorporated historical, sociocultural, economic and environmental elements congregate in the undercurrent, though its surface is clear and seemingly placid. In keeping with this ideology, this body of work is focused on engaging others and cultivating dialogues that open new avenues of working, thinking and viewing the world we inhabit."http://yasmeen666.wix.com/yasmeen
Hannah Rose Berry
Hannah Rose BerryImage: Origin, 2017"The figures in my work are drawn from photos I take myself, and then transposed into scenes I createfrom my memories and emotions. I use figure painting as a way to examine and illustrate the relationship between physical self and mental self, body and mind. The outcome is a complex and camouflaged portrait,bluntly questioning and calling attention to standards, social roles, stereotypes, and ultimately the relationship with the self. I work from photographs and observational drawing because I am infatuated with capturing the details of a person and the subtlety of a gesture. I want to relay the empathy or apathy manifested through body language and facial expression. Most often, I paint myself. I like the idea of pairing my voice and perspective with my own image, using my body as a vessel to communicate personal concerns or traumas. In some works, I complicate the image of the body by overlaying and intertwining elements from my surroundings. I pair the figure with symbols, icons, and objects that represent concepts I associate with my body. I'm interested in the allegorical potential of these things, and how their associations and meanings waver. I'm curious of the stories we tell ourselves through our relationship with these objects."http://www.hannahroseberryfinearts.com
Rosa Bozhkov
Rosa BozhkovImage: Summer in the Place Where Baba Used to Live, 2017"I want my work to condense my experience of seeing and being in my body, and I hope to arrive at a place you cannot quite locate in memory. I’m interested in exploring how memory distorts and creates new and strange realities.Through painting and drawing, I travel my own personal history, reimagining events and interactions that remain visually and emotionally vivid in my mind. These memories often deal with buckling under the pressure of U.S. beauty standards, coming into conflict with the unruliness of my body, and the complex displacement experienced as the daughter of two immigrants, feeling as though I am from three countries and nowhere all at once."
Nell Breyer
Nell BreyerImage: Perspective on a Dance in Sol Le Witt’s ‘Bars of Color within Squares (MIT), 2012Nell Breyer is an artist working at the intersection of digital media, movement and the public domain. She enlists approaches from vision sciences, art and engineering to understand contemporary practices in participatory media and performance shaping our public spaces. Her work has been shown internationally in art institutes (Museo del’arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, Sadlers Wells, Cankarjev Dom, The Bangladesh National Museum, The National Academy of Arts & Sciences, Contemporary Art Museum St Louis, MASS MoCA, The Philadelphia Art Alliance, Carroll and Sons) and urban settings(Boston City Hall, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, The World Financial Center, The Big Screen Project etc). She has received supported from The Trust ForMutual Understanding, Impulstanz Vienna, Kaleidescope/ UNESCO, Sadler’sWells, LEF New England, Massachusetts Cultural Council, New EnglandFoundation for the Art’s (NDP), and the Council for the Arts at MIT.Nell was a Research Affiliate at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies and the Program in Art, Culture and Technology from 2002-2010; a Digital Fellow at Dance Theater Workshop (2004) and Baryshnikov Art Center (2009). She received her BA in painting (Yale Univ., 1994), an MSC in Cognitive Neuroscience (Oxford Univ., 1997) and an MS in Media, Arts and Sciences (MIT,2002). She completed her doctorate at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design in 2011 and has since been consulting with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, on several international initiatives involving digital media, copyright, and the public domain. She currently teaches at Massachusetts College of Art and Design and at RISD’s Digital + Media department. Her recent publications can be found in the Journal for Artistic Research (2011), Movement Research Journal(2011), and ISMAR 2010 Art, Media and Humanities (2010).
Andrea Caldarise
Andrea CaldariseImage: By the Schuylkill, there's no Ikea., 2017Andrea Caldarise is a painter, collage-maker, and collaborator inspired by happenstance conversations, exploring, and memories. Her art practice focuses on recreating a landscape through line, color, and memory. Imagery oscillates from literal to abstract, charting the ephemeral feeling of a place. Caldarise studied painting and art history at Tyler School of Art, Temple University where she received her BFA and she completed an MA in Arts Administration at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been awarded residencies at the Post Contemporary, Troy, NY and Yale School of Art’s summer fellowship in Norfolk, CT. Caldarise has exhibited her artwork in Philadelphia, Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Rome, Italy. She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY.http://www.andreacaldarise.com/
Abby Cochran
Abby CochranThis Painting is a Whore, 2017Abby Cochran’s work incorporates mixed media, sculpture and installation as a means to confront and reject fear. The work is reaction based and rooted in abstraction. Elements of destruction blend into notions of an “anti-pretty” aesthetic. She has exhibited work in Lacoste, France and Savannah, GA. Born in Indianapolis Indiana, Cochran received a BFA in painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2017. She is currently living and working in Brooklyn, NY.https://abbycochranstudio.com/
Haleigh Collins
Haleigh CollinsImage: Becoming, 2015"My work toes the line between pleasurable and disgusting by appropriating remnants of U.S. millennial popular culture. It employs, subverts, and perhaps contributes to our addictive, media and product-driven experience. My recent video and installation piece Haul presents the political implications of Youtube product reviews and “self-care” culture.In the piece, six different versions of myself are projected onto a six shelves full of white, non-descript containers and objects. These characters hold similar items and comments on them, sometimes smashing them onto the ground where they release colorful paint. In typical Youtube review form, the language of the commentary personifies the products, connecting bodies to consumer goods. Political critiques are mixed in with product reviews. Haul presents the contemporary dilemma of which bodies deserves aesthetic and emotional preservation—those that have historically and currently been denied it--and which have the resources to obtain it.My video work raises questions about contemporary communication, attention span, and online identity by employing fast cuts and found audio and video footage. I’m influenced by trends in the language of marketing and popular culture, such as that of Youtube tutorials, political discourse, and early-2000 reality TV shows. Many of my videos are performative and feature myself, which allows me to present the complications of self-representation online. I seek to overwhelm the audience with media, in a way that is both pleasurable and disturbing, creating a sense of dissonance within them.My paintings, with their corporal forms and colors, are also both attractive and revolting. I use materials that are evocative of the bodily and excess; I primarily paint with oils but also have included rubber, lip-gloss, shower gel, and saran wrap. I aim to disorient the viewer sensorially, with forms and scents evoking human physicality yet evading recognition. Sometimes these materials disintegrate or change over time."http://haleighcollins.com
Kat Deiner
Kat DeinerImage: Untitled, 2017Working from direct observation, Kat Deiner paints subjects in nature that often go overlooked.  By magnifying thoughtfully selected fragments of each subject, she offers a new perspective by removing it from its typical context.  Raw texture, color, and light drive her compositions, pushing them towards abstraction, while anchoring them in reality.  Deiner finds her subjects in everyday surroundings in Brooklyn and throughout her travels abroad.www.KatDeiner.com
Martin Dull
Martin DullImage: Temptest (triptych), 2017"My goal is simple: to communicate through paint and found objects the many and diverse sensations of being within a non-objective environment. I work abstractly because I am interested in the individual and subjective responses to these forms. Whether or not the state of viewing is consistent, a dialogue will emerge through the experiential nature of the work – opening it to a set of truths that can be discussed and debated by all. The paintings probe the viewer; are you being transported to an excited state? Is there elation, anxiety, feelings of curiosity or disruption? In this sense, my work serves as a bridge from the personal to the public, the intangible to the geographical, while encouraging communication and, ultimately, unity."www.martindullart.com
Alyssa Eble
Alyssa EbleImage: Uncook, 2017Alyssa Eble is an artist living in Brooklyn, New York. Her work investigates form and figure through the lens of personal deliberations in a variety of perspectives. 
Eliza Evans
Eliza Evansimage: Unbroken Mile, 2017"My family started out in Pittsburgh where my father worked in industrial plastics. When my family moved to a log house on a few acres in Tennessee we packed our belongings in round, sturdy containers that had held 50 and 100 pounds of tetrafluoroethylene resin. A fascination with industry and nature has followed me since. The places I make art look more like light industrial spaces than a studio. It is the space where the mechanical and the organic--systemization and lived experience—meet. I work with paper, construction materials, plastic, trees, rock, wire, cabling, electronics and lighting to instantiate the technological mediation of everyday life and the cumulative impact of this mediation over time.  I explore different models of visibility and engagement.  When my work moved from paper to installation and sculptural works, viewers engaged in different ways—moving their bodies around and through the pieces, touching them, and even stealing from and vandalizing them.  I think this engagement is a response, in part, to the removal of imagery and information. Figures are erased and shrouded. Trees are encased. The wrapping reduces the object to a shape and masks textures, colors, and other indicators of meaning. The absence of information forces the viewer to fill in the blanks to arrive at a contingent understanding of a thing prompting curiosity, empathy, and, perhaps, intervention. Contingent understanding is robust in that it can adapt to and accommodate new information. It survives in science and folklore and almost never in granite.  The wrapping is also a seal but it is unclear if the object is being sealed from the world or the world from the object."  http://www.eevans.net
Meryl Feigenberg
Meryl Feigenbergimage: Light leak, 2016"Looking towards a then and there, a place and time that lives in the future yet occurred in the past. A moment before naming, before assumptions, presumptions, and judgments. One where we can be open to not knowing what we think we see and allow for looking to take place. Look closely with duration at material and substance to search, to question, to wonder. A quiet insistence for nuance, in search of subtlety to shift perspective and meaning. There is nothing to look at and everything to see.The only way I have ever understood something is to find out for myself. Through photography, video, making objects and finding objects, performative gestures, installation, drawing, text and audio, I observe and question, in search of more and other ways of seeing. A place of not knowing, of un-knowing, of withholding from conclusion."http://www.merylfeigenberg.com/
Jacqueline Ferrante
Jacqueline FerranteImage: Haze II, 2016Jacqueline Ferrante is a visual artist based in Brooklyn, NY. Her thickly layered abstractions are mirrors of the history, buildup, and decay found predominantly in urban environments. She investigates the relationship between color, texture, and form as they change over time. Telephone poles with decades of postings and detritus accumulation, sides of brick buildings with cracked paint revealing moments of history along with color trends, transits paths, the ebb and flow of life and human touch. Her work re-creates and mimics this history and texture through the process of layering, rubbing, and stripping paint. These techniques function as a gesture towards the forgotten beauty of the world around us.http://www.jacquelineferrante.com/
Christina Graham
Christina GrahamImage: Installation view of Ridgewood Reflections at Brethren Gallery, Queens"Apertures and obstructions serve as frameworks for formal play between “painting as view into illusionistic space” and “painting as object.” By using imagery from the home—windows, curtains, fences, doors, and mirrors—I explore the perceived distinctions between public and private space; the literal and metaphoric effects of the built environment on the way we see. My new body of work will replace traditional still life objects with mirrors to create confusing spacial situations where "the real" is subject to perceived point of view. Professor of Architecture Georges Teyssot writes, “Like any other instrument (including language), the window is an apparatus that separates and unites.” At times teetering between abstract and representational, the paintings playfully poke at the language of privacy, subjectivity, and the canon of 20th century European and American painting. Water-based paints allow for faux painting techniques, pours, stains, airbrushing and rendering, as well as unexpected color relationships. My intention is that by leaving some ambiguity in these interiors and exteriors, they will remain open to multiple interpretations, and embody the precariousness of the constructs we build around and inside of ourselves." http://www.christinagraham.net
Dianne Hebbert
Dianne HebbertImage: Magnets, 2016 "Exploring representations of presence, power, and identity my larger than life and life size portraits examine these dynamics through size and posture. My work is grounded in inclusion and diversity. Referencing my own experiences and background as aNicaraguan American, my portraits are depictions of people from my life. They are portraits of people of color with narratives of immigration, the first generation American experience and the LGBTQ perspective.As my body of work progresses I am beginning to explore the history of Nicaragua and it's relationship to colonization and slavery. I am incorporating patterns and historical maps into my figurative work.I paint figures onto frosted mylar with flashe paint. The figures are then carefully removed from the rectangular frame. Removing the images from a pictorial background allows the paintings exist as we do, constantly in motion and interacting with their surroundings. Exploiting the inherent qualities of the translucent material, the paintings hang like objects in space and are viewed as objects in the round. Each image exists asa discrete object and also as an installation. The artwork may be installed singularly or in flexible groupings, allowing a sense of play and recreating a community laden with nostalgia and personal interactions"http://www.diannehebbertartist.tumblr.com
Annika Klein
Annika KleinImage: Black Book (detail), 2017. Though my background is in photography, I have most recently turned to making artist books. This past year, I was given a couple of blank book “dummies,” which proved, a  fertile space for experiment and exploration. As a formal constraint, I decided to use only white and black paints, though collaged elements were allowed color. Experimenting with materials—often fabric, artificial flowers, or other stereotypically feminine ones—has long been a favorite way of working. The book format has granted me a new freedom: a spread within a larger object is much less precious, has much less pressure to succeed than an individual piece to be hung on a wall. At a time when many famous artists are known for gigantic, polished pieces, assembled by assistants, I having been relishing in practice over product. https://www.annikaklein.com/
Genevieve Lowe
Genevieve LoweImage: Sun Rocks Installation, 2017"Throughout various material forms, my work investigates the American landscape and methods for conveying or translating a “sense of place.” Ideally, I would like to invoke an identity or portrait of a landscape without using the traditional modes of landscape history painting.In particular, I have been thinking a lot about Jane Bennett’s book “Vibrant Matter” and her ideas around vital materiality, as well as original beliefs connected to animism.What does it mean to consider the inanimate as being inextricably linked to our humanness and identity, both in energy, emotion and actual chemical build? Can this shift and thinking (and in my case perceiving/representing) change the way we think about the environments we move through and live in?" 
Jamie Mirabella
Jamie MirabellaImage: fall, 2017"My work focuses on found, photographic imagery and in particular, representations of women. I study images, looking, sorting, cutting, folding, and combining imagery in order to create new meanings. I interrupt the surface level visual messages to draw attention to photography’s power to inform beliefs and influence behavior. I am very interested in how our brains interpret the signals we receive from photographic images. Even though we know better, there’s a natural tendency to accept what we’re seeing exists.By juxtaposing or combining seemingly incongruous images, distorting proportions, and stripping out context from the raw material, I’m looking to question that smooth acceptance. At the same time, I’m introducing new avenues for processing images that are so familiar we take their meanings for granted. I am most drawn to images that appear at first glance to be unambiguous, such as iconic landscapes, extreme feminine glamour, obvious luxury. Mixing, dissecting, and repurposing the source material complicates the data. Questions of class, of labor and work, of what is natural, beautiful, precious…these are themes I return to, menacing the original messages with my own interpretations."
Kate Muehlemann
Kate MuehlemannImage: Formation, 2014Kate Muehlemann is an anatomical, figurative, and portrait artist, who lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.  She currently studies portraiture with Sharon Sprung at The Art Student's League.  Working as a Registered Nurse and caring for human life for over a decade has led to her reverence for the body and it's intricate physical form.  When she began working in Hospice, her work became influenced by the daily reminder of an inevitable and shared truth, which is mortality.  This shift has led to exploration of what comes before our ideas of who we are, and what remains once the things we use to define ourselves fall away.   www.katemuehlemann.com 
Gal Nissim
Gal NissimImage: Cut&Paste, 2014-15"Living in a city, it is easy to forget that one inhabits an ecosystem. Yet we are required to share our city with a variety of animals that have evolved around us. These animals are routinely viewed as intruders, categorized as “pests”, and evoke reactions of disgust and fear. As an artist and a scientist, I am interested in exploring this relationship with the hope that viewers will reevaluate their preconceptions of nature in the urban environment."https://www.galnissim.com/ 
Justin O'Brien
Justin O'BrienImage: Neesus, 2017, 18 x 22""My work deals with disparity. More specifically, the strange, uncanny space that exists between two disparate things. Until recently, I made work that celebrated this space. I made paintings intending to mimic the visual language of digital imagery. I made work that reconciled separation with nostalgia. I was interested in how the materiality of paint could mimic a digital render, or an arrangement of images on a screen. Over the past year, I've become aware that this disparity runs parallel to what David Wojnarowicz identifies as "the preinvented world": a construct of subliminal (or more recently, coerced) control that thrives in the space between truth and lie; Between real and perceived. This is the world of "the alternative fact". The palliative, euphemistic "falsehood" that sits on top of systemic oppression, bigotry, hatred, and violence. This is a space of uncanniness, which becomes less interesting and more terrifying every day. A decomposition of objective reality into chaos and doubt. So in response, my interest in disparity has descended from an idyllic musing on varying aesthetics to an exploration of subjectivity, a response to adversity, and an inquiry into my own identity in context with the present world.I am currently making paintings on various surfaces: canvas, linen, panel, 3D printed surfaces, and paper. I tend to expose a portion of the raw surface as it speaks to the reality of the object. The content of the work oscillates between abstraction and representation as it relates to an idea, which also exists at varying levels of authenticity, or validity. I produce digital work in analogue with the paintings which may simply inform the painting, or go as far as being printed on paper, cut and collaged into the work itself. I use a lot of matte black paint. Black is immutable, and can suggest limitless and terrible possibilities. I like the psychological element this brings to my work. The positive shapes exist with the negative in an expression of structure amidst chaos. Progress parallel with regression. Interplay between seemingly organized and seemingly entropic forces."www.justinliamobrien.com
Aston Philip
Aston PhilipImage: Aquila Audax (Mating Season), 2016"My Practice is contemporary painting both representational and abstract. Examining the coexistence and common ground of many worlds, human and non-human, physical and immaterial, cultural and biospheric.My paintings primarily explore ideas of interconnectivity, I am currently particularly interested in research on the vast and essential nature of symbiosis. Particularly how interrelations exist both inside of and outside between species and how the practice of painting operates and critically engages in similar, simultaneous and essential, expanding and contracting spheres of influence. Essentially there is no isolated unit of either life or art. My paintings are very much entanglements / hybrids / holoboints / synergies / monsters in both physical and symbolic natures."http://www.astonphilip.com
Zoe Schwartz
Zoe SchwartzImage: breastplate, 2017 Zoe Schwartz is an emerging artist based in New York City.  She recently earned a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Michigan where she graduated Summa Cum Laude, 2016.  She works in a variety of media to create an immersive and accessible experience for her audience, including sculpting, drawing, painting, and printmaking.  Intrigued by the effects of gender in art, she analyzes and critiques the tension between depictions and objectifications of female bodies by the male gaze in current media and art history.  As a result, her art embraces femininity and lies at the intersection of romance, intimacy, sex, gender, and race. Post college, Zoe began working at the New York Art Foundry where she casted her own bronze sculptures.  Through the act of processing sculptures into bronze, Zoe began thinking about the gendering of art media and the prevalent misogyny in art/art spaces; historically, female artists have been pushed out of these traditionally male spaces. Zoe focuses on the question, “What does it mean to be a woman-identifying artist performing ‘masculine’ bronze casting?” There is a tension that is reflected in the juxtaposition between the chosen subject and medium. Her art tackles these issues while speaking to larger themes of the body, womanhood, and feminism.http://zoe-schwartz.squarespace.com/
Alexandra Seiler
Alexandra SeilerImage: If the Glut Continues, 2017 , acrylic on panel "When I am succeeding as a painter, I like to think of myself as a tuning fork. I am attuned to the environment that is inspiring me;  I have surrendered to the image that has overtaken my curiosity;  I have absorbed the rhythms of whatever is calling me and nowwant to leave my own imprint.  Color is crucial here. I try to use a vibrant palette to evoke what is overtaking me, so that I can best refract my emotion and my conception of “it” onto the canvas, then to my viewer.Painting is thus a channel to my way of seeing the world. As I paint, I try to bring forth whatever is in my subconscious well. I constantly collect images to make sure the wellis never dry - drawn in a sketchbook, logged in my memory, marked on the page of a found book, photographed from the lit screen of a paused movie.  They strike anywhere at anytime and just like that my well is replenished. I typically begin with a sketch from one of these resources and try to let the work build naturally, layering images and following natural paths that relate them to one another.  Of course, I am expressing my interiority but also trying to tap into something harmonious amongst all of us, so that if the work succeeds, my viewer is able to relate their own experience to my work."http://alexandraseiler.com
Ruyin Tsai
Ruyin TsaiImage: Tabby, 2016Ruyin Tsai is a Brooklyn based artist, originally from Taiwan. She is interested in contradictions and complications, using absurdity to point at the dilemmas of the world humans perceive. Her work is a conversation between hybrid species of digital images and physical elements, conveying the facts and doubts with a sense of alienation. She creates a thin piece of silent candy paper warping the lasting resistance against the existence of systems and individual, shouting a tiny intricate desire to be set free.https://ruyintsai.myportfolio.com/
Lesley Wamsley
Lesley WamsleyImage: Hair Net, 2016, 26" x 20"Lesley Wamsley is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. In 2012, she earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the State University of New York at New Paltz. Her work has been in national and international exhibitions including the Endless Biennial, New York City, NY and Graphics Biennial in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Recent residencies include The Wassaic Project, Wassaic, NY and Endless Editions, New York City, NY. Her work is held by the Museum of Modern Art Artists’ Book Collection, New York City, NY. She is an adjunct professor in the Foundation Department at the State University of New York at New Paltz. In 2015, she was the recipient of a Merit Award for excellence in teaching.www.lesleywamsley.com
Soo Yun
Soo YunImage: Duracells, 2017, 14 x 11"“Fuck like a bunny."A bunny has a cute, adorable, and naive image and many children love it. Contrary to its childlike feature, a bunny has a sexual meaning, which refers a quick and minute sex, and simultaneously a promiscuous sex. For these reasons, in my culture, a bunny stands fora whore or the premature ejaculation of a man.My upbringing from conservative society requires me to behave discretely as a good girl,or a well-‐‐educated lady.  I have to be in discord between the social expectation about me and my instinctive desire from human nature.I want to focus on the hypocritical duality of bunny being cute yet aggressive. The hypocritical bunny mirrors my personality and human nature. My sophisticate and pleasant personality can hide my dirty and vicious desire. Human desire increases as vigorously and continuously as a naive bunny reproduce itself.I keep reproducing bunnies in my work. Through the duplication by casting and printing bunny images in my artworks, I reflect the bunny’s reproduction; and also I try to solve my repressed desire. “Fuck like a bunny.”http://artistsoo.com
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